Two Bald Eagle Eggs Hatch On The Same Day In Pittsburgh

Canada

Another day brings another happy news, as two bald Eagle eggs are hatched on the same day in Pittsburgh. The first eaglet was born on 23 March at 4 am, while the second eaglet hatched only hours later at 10 pm.

Bald eagle
(Image Source: Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania)

Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania announced the birth of the eagles on their Facebook page a few days ago. They wrote, “This bald eagle laid three eggs. Only one of the eggs remains for hatching. The hatching is due till Friday”.

Additionally, they mentioned that the first baby weighed around 3.5 ounces.

Rachel Handel from the Audubon Society told CBS Pittsburgh, “For the first time in their nesting history, they’ve actually hatched two eggs in the same day.”

Bald eagle
(Image Source: Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania)

In the pictures uploaded by the Audubon Society, the babies are seen to be covered in soft grey fur. However, hair will replace the fur in two weeks time. The bald eagle is not completely bald instead it has a snowy featured head and has a white tail. As soon as these babies grow, they will exhibit these features.

However, if the baby is born prematurely their features are dark till they are of five years of age. Due to this reason, their parents can distinguish them from others.

These types of eagles mate for life. They have the biggest nest among birds. This is because they are located high above the trees.

Moreover, Bald eagles love to hunt fish as it is their favorite meal. The reason they live near lakes or coasts is that they can easily feed on it. On the other hand, they like to steal other animals’ prey too. They eat small mammals as their food.

(Image Source: Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania)
Bald Eagles are very dear to the Americans as it is the United States National Bird. In addition, one can find them in Alaska and in Canada too.

For years, Bald Eagles were hunted for sport and also to save fishes. Thus, they were at risk of extinction. For their conservation, different measures have been taken over the years.

(Image Source: Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania)

Let’s keep our fingers crossed for the arrival of the third eaglet!

By: thekoalabears.com

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