PLAYTIME’S OVER Sweet polar bear cubs try to play with mother – but she looks like she wants a break

Canada

SWEET polar bear cubs were photographed trying to play with their mother – but she looked like she wanted a break from her rambunctious offspring.

The adorable polar bear family was spotted rolling around in the snow after coming out of a three-month hibernation.

 The momma bear was spotted lying on her back with her feet up in the air - as her cubs disregard her personal space
The momma bear was spotted lying on her back with her feet up in the air – as her cubs disregard her personal space

 It was the first time these fluffy young cubs ventured out of their den since they were born
It was the first time these fluffy young cubs ventured out of their den since they were born

They were photographed in -40F temperatures in Wapusk National Park, in Manitoba, Canada.

It was the first time the fluffy young cubs ventured out of their den since they were born.

The bright-eyed and bushy-tailed young ones were seen having a face-off with each other and harassing their mother.

One photo shows the momma bear lying on her back with her feet up in the air – as her cubs appear to climb up onto her stomach.

Another photo captured one of the cubs standing on its hind legs, with its front paws hugging its mom’s leg.

But the mother was looking in the opposite direction as for some means of escape.

 The momma bear looks the other way as her cub appears to pull her leg
The momma bear looks the other way as her cub appears to pull her leg

 One of the cubs is spotting on top of its mom's back
One of the cubs is spotting on top of its mom’s back

Personal space is something this momma bear doesn’t seem to have as her cubs were pictured climbing on her back and pulling her leg.

Despite the cubs appearing to harass their mom, they were also spotted following her footsteps and calmly sitting beside her.

According to Oceana Canada: “Although polar bears grow to be huge, they start their life extremely small and helpless.

“When born, cubs are blind, toothless and covered in a sparse layer of soft, short fur.”

Polar bears are most likely to give birth to twins.

“This evolutionary adaptation increases the likelihood that at least one cub will survive to adulthood, especially given the harsh and unforgiving conditions found in their Arctic habitat,” Oceana explains.

 The polar bear family was photographed in minus 40-degree temperatures in Wapusk National Park, in Manitoba, Canada
The polar bear family was photographed in minus 40-degree temperatures in Wapusk National Park, in Manitoba, Canada

 The cubs follow their mom, who possibly weighs between 300lbs and 550lbs
The cubs follow their mom, who possibly weighs between 300lbs and 550lbs

 The polar bear and her two seem to enjoy being out of hibernation
The polar bear and her two seem to enjoy being out of hibernation

Polar bears are the largest land carnivore, with the average male weight ranging from 880lbs to 1,300lbs.

Adult female usually weigh between 300lbs and 550lbs.

Despite their fur appearing to be white, a polar bear’s fur is actually transparent and obtains its color by reflecting and refracting light from the sun and off the snow.

According to the Canadian Geographic: “The polar bear is well adapted to life in the extremes of the Arctic.

“Its distinctive white coat acts as camouflage in the snow and ice.”

The magazine describes Canada as one of five “polar bear nations” – as well as the United States (Alaska), Russia, Denmark (Greenland) and Norway.

More than two-thirds of the world’s polar bears are located in the Canadian Arctic.

But sadly, they were recently listed as a threatened species under the United States’ Endangered Species Act.

 Despite their fur appearing to be white, a polar bear's fur is actually transparent
Despite their fur appearing to be white, a polar bear’s fur is actually transparent

 One of the cubs stands underneath its mom
One of the cubs stands underneath its mom

By: thesun.co.uk

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