Baby Koala Refuses To Let Go During Mom’s Surgery (PHOTOS)

Australia

While performing an emergency surgery on “Lizzy”, a koala that had been hit by a car near Brisbane, staff at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital (AZWH) had an extra hurdle to work around: her adorable baby who refused to let go during the operation.

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Image: Ben Beaden/Australia Zoo

Both mom and baby (nicknamed “Phantom”) survived the ordeal, but the pair continues to stick together as they heal. “Phantom still stays with Lizzy during her procedures and checkups,” says team member Alex Halford. “Lizzy’s surgery was successful, and she’s now on antibiotics as we continue her treatment for a collapsed lung and face trauma. She’s recovering well in the care of our hospital staff.”

The hospital’s emergency response unit receives up to an unbelievable 100 calls per day – 70 percent of which are car collision victims. “Koalas are among the more common patients we treat,” explains Halford. “On average we take in 70 each month.”

The only time little Phantom leaves his mom’s side is to be weighed, when he is transferred to a makeshift “momma pouch”. “At just 6-months-old, it’s very important that he feels safe and protected while away from mum,” the team says.

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Image: Ben Beaden/Australia Zoo

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Image: Ben Beaden/Australia Zoo

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Image: Ben Beaden/Australia Zoo

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Image: Ben Beaden/Australia Zoo

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Image: Ben Beaden/Australia Zoo

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Image: Ben Beaden/Australia Zoo

The cost of treating a single koala can range from $1,500 to $5,000, so if you’d like to help, visit the AZWH website and make a donation. To keep up with Lizzy and Phantom’s progress, find AZWH on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

UPDATE (June 18, 2015): According to the AZWH: “Lizzy is recovering well after her surgery and is now the one doing all the cuddling … she’s been given antibiotics and is improving every day in care at the hospital. Phantom is putting on weight as well which is a great sign for the health of both mother and baby. We anticipate they will be ready to return to the wild soon with their positive progress.”

Koala Lizzy Joey Phantom Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital 1 2015 06 18

Image: Ben Beaden/Australia Zoo

Koala Lizzy Joey Phantom Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital 2 2015 06 18

Image: Ben Beaden/Australia Zoo

Koala Lizzy Joey Phantom Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital 3 2015 06 18

Image: Ben Beaden/Australia Zoo

Top header image: Ben Beaden/Australia Zoo

By: www.earthtouchnews.com

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